How the Mental Health System is Failing the Mentally Sick

There is a new kind of revolution in Mental health.

On a secular level of contemporary psychiatry, for instance, there’s a “shaking of foundations” of its traditional premises.

Psychiatrist Dr. O. Hobart Mowrer writes:

” … it has been evident that something is seriously amiss in contemporary psychiatry and clinical psychology. Under the sway of Freudian psychoanalysis, these disciplines have not validated themselves either diagnostically or therapeutically. Their practitioners, as persons, have not manifested any exceptional grasp on the virtues and strengths they purportedly help others to acquire. And the impact of their philosophy of life and conception of man and society as a whole has been subtly subversive.”

Remember, this is a psychiatrist speaking, who is making quite a confession, questioning the premises of the profession he’s in!

Let me tell you that for some time now the global mental health system has been sick. It seems that there’s a great robbery of our health in this basic area!

Thus, because we the wounded persons are the victims, many have become vocal in their disillusionment, distrust, cynicism, and discontent.

One of the books you can access to know more is, DJ JAFFE’s book INSANE CONSEQUENCES.

Here’s a review from mentalillnesspolicy.org about the book:

Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill is by far the most well-researched and important book written on mental illness out today. With a foreword by Dr. E. Fuller Torrey, it is a must-have for anyone who wants better care for people with serious mental illness, reports on it, develops policy, works in mental health or criminal justice. It provides actionable ideas to lower rates of homelessness, incarceration, suicide, violence and expense. Book Description: Insane Consequences This well-researched and highly critical examination of the state of our mental health system by the industry’s most relentless critic presents a new and controversial explanation as to why—in spite of spending $147 billion annually—140,000 seriously mentally ill are homeless, 390,000 are incarcerated, and even educated, tenacious, and caring people can’t get treatment for their mentally ill loved ones. DJ Jaffe blames the mental health industry and the government for shunning the 10 million adults who are the most seriously mentally ill—mainly those who suffer from schizophrenia and severe bipolar disorder—and, instead, working to improve “mental wellness” in 43 million others, many of whom are barely symptomatic. Using industry and government documents, scientific journals, and anecdotes from his thirty years of advocacy, Jaffe documents the insane consequences of these industry-driven policies: psychiatric hospitals for the seriously ill are still being closed; involuntary commitment criteria are being narrowed to the point where laws now require violence rather than prevent it; the public is endangered; and the mentally ill and their families are forced to suffer. Insane Consequences proposes smart, compassionate, affordable, and sweeping reforms designed to send the most seriously ill to the head of the line for services rather than to jails, shelters, prisons, and morgues. It lays out a road map to spend less on mental “health” and more on mental “illness”––replace mission creep with mission control and return the mental health system to a focus on the most seriously ill. It is not money that is lacking; it’s leadership. This book is a must-read for anyone who works in the mental health industry or cares about the mentally ill, violence, homelessness, incarceration, or public policy.

Read more at: https://mentalillnesspolicy.org/insane-consequences.html

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s